ALL ABOUT ME AND FAMILIES

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HOW MANY FEET IN THE BED FREE PRINTABLE


HOW MANY FEET IN THE BED?
Feet and bed pattern FREE!
This is one of my favorite books for family theme week and it goes perfect with the book, How Many Feet in the Bed? by Diane Johnston Hamm.
I printed a bed (get your free pattern below) and taped in on a cookie sheet. I then cut out some feet shapes (free pattern below). I attached some magnetic tape on the back of each foot.
I let each child come forward and place the number of feet in the bed that represents their families.

1. Count the number of feet. How many are boys? How many are girls?
2. Are there more boys or girls feet in your family?
3. Count the number of feet by 2's.
4. Graph the number of boy's and girl's feet in the class.


Free pattern here.


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FAMILY TIES


This was a fun project. I used some scrapbook paper and cut out tie shapes. With a letter of explanation (download your September Editable Family Project letter here) I sent it home for the families to decorate with family photos. Before hanging them on our door each child got to share all about their family. They loved it.

Note: I made these ties into a class book after they came down from the wall. A class favorite.

FIRST NAMES

A MY NAME IS ALICE


Saw this idea on Pinterest to go with the book A My Name is Alice and this is my class' results . The children cut and drew faces on their pictures and then dictated what they liked that started with the first letter of their name (OK lotsa help was needed here). But I think they turned out really cute.


HOW MANY LETTERS ARE IN MY NAME

CLASSIFICATION

We used our pictures to graph our hair color and we colored some eyes and graphed our eye color.


Family Classifying

We cut out pictures from magazines and classified them as parents or children. This was a lot harder tan I expected. Well not the classifying but the cutting. The following year I cut out a lot of pictures from magazine and let them choose the pictures and paste them in the proper category. Much better!

 

Family Tree


From Mrs. McD. kindergarten classroom.
This was a family at home project - the top row has the grandparents, middle row has the parents and the students aunts and uncles, and lower row has the student, bothers and/or sisters and cousins.
This tree is made with moss, leaves, and bark. Wow.


We painted our arms brown and hand green to make the tree. Then added die-cut apples to the tree - each apple has been programmed with a family member's name. We added a family photo to complete our family tree poster.

MORE

I AM THE BEST
At the young age of six or seven,there are the late bloomers who are resourseful and talented ,but not confidnt enough.The following idea is for them,
Get each child to draw and colour something.If you want to you can even divide them into groups.After all have finished,take 2 or three drawings and mismatch them to get a complete picture.Get them to comment on the picture.Then remove a vital part of the picture {as far as possible the quitest child's drawing}and explain to them how the picture won't be complete even if one of their drawings are missing.Reassure every little one that he or she is vital. This makes a tremendous difference to the sober and quiet ones.

I AM SPECIAL
Submitted by Renee 
 I am special
 look and see
 look and see
 someone special and its me
 and its you.

BODY PARTS TIME FILLER
Submitted by Janiece
As a time-filler between activities, I ask the kids to put their fingers on their knees, hands on their heads, then get progressively difficult.  For example, I might have them put their nose on their toes.  This is a good way to introduce new parts (put your wrist on your shin, etc.)   The kids can also take turns coming up with new ideas.

SPECIAL ME
Submitted by Sarah
The author of this poem is unknown, but I would like to share it.

"Special Me"
Special Me
Special Me.
How I wonder.
What I will be.
In this big world, I can be.
Anything, I want to be.

WATCH CAREFULLY
Have a child come to the front of the circle. Have him/her stand still. Then whisper a body part to him/her. All of the children should watch carefully. S/he briefly moves that part and then stands quietly again. The children
call out which body part s/he moved.

HANDY BOOK
On a piece of folded construction paper trace a child's hand. Cut out the hand, leaving the fold uncut. You end up with a hand-shaped booklet that will open up. Place small amounts of paint in shallow containers. Let the children
decorate their hand books by doting their thumb or fingers with paint making thumb prints or finger prints.
Print each child's name on the outside of the book.

FINGERPRINTS
Submitted by Tanya
We make fingerprints and look at them through a magnifying glass. Here is the best way to do fingerprints so that you can really
see the differences: take a pencil and cover a piece of paper with a heavy layer of graphite, then rub your finger across it several times, then take a piece of clear tape and lift the print from your finger onto the tape.
Place the tape on another piece of paper and the print is very clear - much better I've found than using stamp pads. With older
kids you can even classify them.

ME SUITCASE
Submitted by Tanya
Each child was assigned a special day to talk about themselves.  The day before their special day, the child decorated a grocery bag which became their "Me Suitcase."  We put their names on it with a special note for the parents to let their child fill it with things that are special to them.
The next day we gave the child a special time of day to take the things out of the suitcase and talk about them.  Things sent in were family pictures, a favorite toy, vacation pictures, souvenirs they collected, a favorite article of clothing, etc.  The children couldn't wait for their day to share their suitcase. We said this poem for each child on their day:
Everyone is special.
Someone special who
 Walks and talks in ways
 That only he/she can do!

We know someone special.
Someone we like, too.
 Here is someone we call (name)
 We like you 'cause you're you!

A HANDY MOBILE
In just a jiffy you can make a handy mobile. Trace around your hand, on four pieces of construction paper of
different colours. Cut out four hand shapes. Tape a hand shape to each end of two straws. Tie a string to the
middle of each straw and connect the straws. Tie another string to the middle
of the top straw and hang your mobile where it can move around freely.

EYE COLOR
I make a graph that has 4 columns with the words Blue, Green, Brown and  Purple at the bottom and title it EYE COLORS.

I then have each child come up and look in a mirror to see what eye color they have. I use stickers with their names on them and let them place the sticker in the correct column. We then add up the columns to see which one has the most and the least.  Using a color like red as a choice allows me to promote the concept of zero, though sometimes I have a child who is sure their eyes are purple.

This is great for promoting self awareness and an awareness of the similarities and differences in others. My Children love it.  Even works well with the little ones 2-3's

SONGS
Submitted by Krista
Sung to: "B-I-N-G-O"
My arms have parts that bend and move
Every time I use them.
Shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand.
Shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand.
Shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand.
And this is how I move them!

My legs have parts that bend and move
Every time I use them.
Knee, ankle, heel and foot
Knee, ankle, heel and foot
Knee, ankle, heel and foot
And this is how I move them!

My trunk has parts that bend and move
Every time I use them.
Neck, back, waist and hips
Neck, back, waist and hips
Neck, back, waist and hips
And this is how I move them!

I'm made of parts that bend and move
Every time I use them.
Shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand..
Knee, ankle, heel and foot.
Neck, back, waist and hips
And this is how I move them!

All By Myself
Sung to: "Three Blind Mice"
All by myself
All by myself
See what I can do
See what I can do
I can brush my teeth and my hair so neat
I can put my socks and shoes on my feet.
I can get my napkin and snack to eat.
All by myself
All by myself

All by myself
All by myself
See what I can do
See what I can do
I can clean up my toys. I can ride my bike
I can kick a ball and match pictures alike
I can read a book and sing songs that I like
All by myself
All by myself

ALL ABOUT ME
Submitted by Marilyn
During my home visits to my three's class, I have collected their baby pictures, recent pictures, family pictures, a drawing, and magazine pictures of their favorite foods.  I compile this into one class flap book that is used at circle to get acquainted and to take attendance.  It works very well for shy children to talk about their page or to comfort a sad child by seeing his "page" in our special book.  I continue with the theme of All about Me, by bringing in a bathroom scale with bricks, feathers, towels, blocks, etc.  We weigh all the items, then we weigh each child.  We compare the weight and decide that sometimes they are heavier than some of the objects, and sometimes they are not.  Instant Math!  I also measure each child with different colors of yarn.  We then put the yarn on a big chart with each child's name and weight and the children can compare the differences among themselves.  We also do body outlines on brown wrap paper and the children decorate them with marker, crayons and glue and paper scraps and buttons.  We hang them in our hallway.  I made up a flannel board to go with this theme:  You need:
2 flesh tone circles of felt  (one for a boy/girl)
hair (for boy/girl)
3 sets of different eye color
lips, noses and ears

"Here is my face so nice and round (place face on board)
I have two eyes in blue, green or brown (have children select eye color)
I have two ears, and a nose on my face,
And a sweet little mouth so I can taste"
I then pass around small, hand-held mirrors for the children to look at themselves.  They then describe what they see about themselves from the mirror images.  We compare different color eyes, hair, skin tone, etc.
I also play this game with them:  They LOVE guessing the answers from the clues.
I'm thinking of something that sounds like band....
you use soap and water to wash your ____(hands)
I'm thinking of something that sounds like pear,
You brush it and comb it, it is your ___(hair)
I'm thinking of something that sounds like rose,
you use a tissue to blow your __(nose)
I'm thinking of something that sounds like meat,
I put this part of my body into my shoes it is my ___(feet)
I'm thinking of something that sounds like tree,
I'm putting my hands upon my ____(knee)
I'm thinking of something that sounds  like farm,
I put up my hand by raising my ______(arm)
I also cut out pictures from magazines of children.  I back them on cardboard and use clear contact to protect them.  Then I cut them into pieces to make puzzles.  I leave these out and the children enjoy working on them.

I AM SOMEONE SPECIAL
Submitted by Celia
Along with the Somebody Special theme, we also make a big poster and label it  "Thumbody Special" and each child puts his thumb on a stamp pad or in a little paint and puts his or her thumbprint on the poster.I discuss the fact that no two
thumbprints are exactly the same and no two children are exactly the same. It's also a good way to begin talking about likenesses and differences.I will call two children to stand next to me and ask how they are alike, how are they different. At first there is  silence but after I give a few examples, they get the idea.

ALL ABOUT ME
Submitted by Gerri
I would like to share some of the things I have been doing with my kindergartners for our "All About Me" unit which includes the human body:

We made several "living graphs" such as:  measuring the circumference (yes, I introduced that word to them) of their heads I gave each student a long piece of string in which they wrapped around their heads.  They  then placed their finger where the string met and I helped them cut the remainder of the string off.  I set up a graph on the board-vertically was inches, horizontally the children's initials.  I called each student up individually and asked them how many inches they thought their head was around.  I got answers from 2 inches to 50 inches.  I then taped their string on the "graph."  I also did this with their heights.  It gave us an opportunity to compare and contrast the similarities and differences visually.  They really enjoyed these activities.  Next week we are going to measure our feet using a cut out of a foot that is 12 inches long.  This too will make a nice "living graph."  I also took large pieces of white butcher paper and had my students  lie down while a partner traced their body.  The next day they added their features, such as their eyes, ears, nose, mouth,etc.  The following day we took our "bodies" outside to paint on their "clothing."  The final part of the project we cut out the bodies. (We needed to do "surgery" on some of the bodies, some of the children accidentally cut off limbs!)  Over all it turned out terrific.  I hung a heavy piece of yarn across the ceiling in which I clothes pinned the bodies on to.  This was a big hit with the parents at our open house--they got to see their children just "hanging out."

Title: I AM SPECIAL
Submitted by Betty
Hi Gerri - we also trace our bodies but try this extension:
Paint the front of t-shirts with the childrens' hand prints and the backs with their footprints ( we use our school colors so they can wear them on spirit day!).  Then with a permanent marker  or fabric pen on the front write..." I am special..." or if Christian School "God made me special..." around one of the hands.  And on the back , write "...all the way down to my feet!"  - follow the down side of one of the feet.    I like it when the words flow in a curvy line instead of a straight line...be creative.  THEN the biggest hit is when we put all the shirts on the bodies and sit them in the chairs for Open House!  It is an absolutely precious sight!

Title: "A Very Special Person"
Submitted by Margaret
Materials needed:Small facial mirror, Box, large enough to hold the mirror, Paper plate, one per child, Crayons or markers, Yarns of various colors, cut in pieces, Popsicle sticks, one per child, Buttons, two per child, and Glue

What to do:
1. Place the mirror inside the box and replace the cover.
2. Tell the children that there is a very special person hiding in the box. Pass the box around circle to each child.
3. Instruct the children not to look in the box. They may shake it gently and listen to it but the may not open it.
4. As you are passing the box around the circle encourage thinking by asking questions like: "Who do you think is a special person? Could that person really fit in this box? When you shake the box do you hear the sound of a person? What sound do you hear?"
5. After each child has held the box, pass it around again. This time tell them they may peek in the box but may not tell who they see.
6. Give each child a paper plate to decorate. Using yarn for
hair,buttons for eyes and crayons or markers have the children "make" the special person they saw. Glue a popsicle stick at the bottom.
7. Write each child's name on the back. For those who use High Scope in their classrooms at recall have the children bring their decorated face, hold it in front of their own face and reveal who the special person was that they saw.
This is alot of fun, in my classroom even the mom's who were there and teacher's made a mask. We are All Very Special!!

Submitted by Joyce
I have used my big 96 font in D'Nealian manuscript with lines and have printed out all their first names.  They will be used for graphing choices we "vote" on. (ex. favorite color, color of eyes, favorite ice cream flavor, etc.)  I ran 2 copies of each name so that I can cut them apart to put together as a puzzle.  These go in the small snack baggies.  Their names will be the first words we read this year and we're going to look for long and short names, tall and short names, names with loops, dots, etc.  It's always fun and makes the children feel special.  It's very helpful for those who were taught to write in all capital letters too.We're also doing a booklet about families, pets, siblings, etc.  I put this in their portfolios and do a more sophisticated one later in the year.  They can't believe how much better their work is in the latter part of the year.  It's a real ego boost!

Title:Self Awareness/ Similarities and Differences
Submitted by Regina
Art
Materials:  paper doll cutout, multicultural crayons, various collage materials such as yarn, buttons, paper scraps, etc...
Procedure:   For this activity I first read  We Are The Same  We Are Different and discuss this with them.  Then each child gets a doll cutout to color, decorate, etc... to look like themselves.  A mirror is close at hand for anyone to use to see eye color, hair color, etc...  They pick the crayon color that matches their own skin tone the closest to color the face, arms, legs.  Each doll is labeled with the child's name across the belly when done and placed around a picture of the world I have colored in with the dolls holding hands.  I use this as a bulletin board.  Headings can vary as well as time of year it is done.  I have sometimes waited until February to do this with a lesson on Martin Luther King, Jr.

Title:All About Me Self Portrait
Submitted by Tammy
The first full week of school, I teach a theme on "all about me".  One of the activities I have the children do is a self portrait.  I use the large, white construction paper and have the children draw a large picture of themselves on it.  I then use the flesh tone paints we have and mix them to match each of the children's skin tones.  No two are exactly alike.  This is good to use to show the similarities and differences in each of us.  I then have a variety of shades of yarn to match hair color. The children pick out the color that best suits them.  When they are finished, the children have an adorable, true to life portrait of themselves.  They also come away with an awareness of how no one is exactly white, black, red, or yellow--we are all different shades in between.

Submitted by Joyce
I have used my big 96 font in D'Nealian manuscript with lines and have printed out all their first names.  They will be used for graphing choices we "vote" on. (ex. favorite color, color of eyes, favorite ice cream flavor, etc.)  I ran 2 copies of each name so that I can cut them apart to put together as a puzzle.  These go in the small snack baggies.  Their names will be the first words we read this year and we're going to look for long and short names, tall and short names, names with loops, dots, etc.  It's always fun and makes the children feel special.  It's very helpful for those who were taught to write in all capital letters too.We're also doing a booklet about families, pets, siblings, etc.  I put this in their portfolios and do a more sophisticated one later in the year.  They can't believe how much better their work is in the latter part of the year.  It's a real ego boost!

Title:Self Awareness/ Similarities and Differences
Submitted by Regina
Art
Materials:  paper doll cutout, multicultural crayons, various collage materials such as yarn, buttons, paper scraps, etc...
Procedure:   For this activity I first read  We Are The Same  We Are Different and discuss this with them.  Then each child gets a doll cutout to color, decorate, etc... to look like themself.  A mirror is close at hand for anyone to use to see eye color, hair color, etc...  They pick the crayon color that matches their own skin tone the closest to color the face, arms, legs.  Each doll is labeled with the child's name across the belly when done and placed around a picture of the world I have colored in with the dolls holding hands.  I use this as a bulletin board.  Headings can vary as well as time of year it is done.  I have sometimes waited until February to do this with a lesson on Martin Luther King, Jr.

Title:All About Me Self Portrait
Submitted by Tammy
The first full week of school, I teach a theme on "all about me".  One of the activities I have the children do is a self portrait.  I use the large, white construction paper and have the children draw a large picture of themselves on it.  I then use the fleshtone paints we have and mix them to match each of the children's skin tones.  No two are exactly alike.  This is good to use to show the similarities and differences in each of us.  I then have a variety of shades of yarn to match hair color. The children pick out the color that best suits them.  When they are finished, the children have an adorable, true to life portrait of themself.  They also come away with an awareness of how no one is exactly white, black, red, or yellow--we are all different shades in between.

Title: Portfolio
Submitted by Regina
I also use portfolio's in my PreK class to show progress and growth over the year.  What I do is take a picture of each child at the beginning and end of the year as well as include pictures of each child doing various classroom activities as well as on field trips.  At the beginning, middle, and end of the year  ( date everything)  I have the children write their name, age, and draw a picture of themself.  I then measure and record their height.  Other papers done throughout the year include drawing their family, friends, what they want to be, and telling what their favorites are:  color, food, snack, game, tv show, movie, sport, toy,etc...  It's great to see how much progress they make throughout the year this was as it may go by unnoticed as we see them everyday.  The parents love it too!

Title:  Smile-O-Gram (thanks to Bob Lento who
presented one year at a conference I attended).
Submitted by Diane
The certificates are made on the computer with smiley face clip art.  Mine says:  Hooray for ___________.  You're the star of the day!  What a great job you did in ___________________ today.
I give these out to individual children for any special thing they  may do during the day.  i.e.  good listener, being a good friend, sharing with someone, helping someone zipper their coat and so forth. Essentially, it is an on-the-spot award.  It works wonders!!  The kids work really hard to get one.  I just make sure that eventually everyone gets one for something.  They are all so proud of themselves!!

Title: I LIKE KIDS!!
Submitted by MJEFFE
Reading/Poetry
Materials:  Chart Paper and Marker
Write this poem on chart paper and let kids make paper dolls of themselves using wiggly eyes,etc.  I cut the dolls from multicultural construction paper and let them choose the skin color they like best.

I like kids.
I like them lots.
I like them cold.
I like them hots.
I like them quiet.
I like them noisy.
I like them girlsy.
I like them boysy!

 

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