Hummingbird Educational Resources

MICE

 

Literacy




Follow Me on Pinterest

 


Used for retelling Mouse Count

Flip book - flip bottom protion to match middle portion and visa versa.
 
Have an idea you would like to share? SUBMIT IDEAS - Submit an idea and receive a coupon for 20% off your next purchase from Hummingbird Educational Resources Catalog

IF YOU GIVE A MOUSE A COOKIE

Submitted by Amy
Counting Chip Cookies
1. Make 10 large round shapes. I found some small cheapo round pillows at a crafts store. You can also just laminate some brown paper, and cut into circles. 2. With a permanent marker, write a number (1 to 10) on each cookie. (do this before laminating, if using paper)
3. Attach the appropriate number of scratchy velcro dots on each cookie. (The 5 cookie will have 5 velcro dots, etc.)
4. Make 55 black dots (the chocolate chips!) out of laminated paper or fabric. Attach a fuzzy velcro dot to each.

Encourage the children to stick the chocolate chips onto the cookies! Help them count the chips, and recognize the numbers. A nice tactile way for children to work on one-to-one correspondence and number recognition.

Submitted by Robin
 I love the book If You Give A Mouse A Cookie! I gathered up all the things that were in the story.....A plastic cookies....a tiny broom,....crayons.....pen....small cloth for a blanket and pillow......a small box to make the bed and so on.  I made a pair of mouse ears and attached them to a head band.  When I read the story someone gets to play mouse and wear the ears. and the other children select something from the box to give to the mouse. As I read the story the mouse goes and collects the items and when the story is done everything is back in the box and ready to put away.  The children like to take the box in small groups and one "reads" the story while the others take turns doing the rest.

In dramatic play, we are going to add baking equipment to the dramatic play area. I put a small tray out and am just going to let them stir and line up bottle caps as cookies.  Thought I'd have out some construction paper , scissors, etc. and see if they can create some of their own "cookies" and "cheese".
In art, I thought we could marble roll and then have the child find one dry spot to thumbprint a mouse (adding ears, whiskers, legs, etc. with an ink pen).  Don't you think they would just love going home and asking mom or dad to find the mouse?   In the fine motor center, I am going to try to have them try a variety of ways to poke or make holes in pieces of "cheese", (yellow, white, and orange construction paper pre-cut in various shapes).
In the Math Center, I thought of creating a counting game with the cookie like cereal pieces.

Cookie Poem:
Five round cookies as yummy as can be.
The first cookie said, "Please eat me!"
The second cookie said, "I have lots of chocolate chips"
The third cookie said, "I'll taste good on your lips"
The fourth cookie said, "I'm right here on the pan"
The fifth cookie said, "Find me if you can!"
Then "Ding!" went the timer
'Cause the cookies were done
We ate all the cookies and had lots of fun!

Make a Class Big Book "If you Give a Mouse"
On separate large, white paper circles write each child's completion to the following sentence:
"If you give a mouse a ________. he will __________."
Have him illustrate his page. Bind all the pages together between same-sized tan construction paper covers.
Add facial features, whiskers and paper ears to the cover.

Mouse Cookies
With the children, prepare a batch of drop cookie dough. Demonstrate how to drop three spoonfuls of dough onto a cookie sheet so that it will resemble a mouses head with two ears when baked. The mouse cookies can be frosted or details can be added with raisins, chocolate chips, an dstring licorice.

Play Mouse, Mouse, Where's the Cheese
This game is played in cicle formation. Arrange the chairs and place one in the center of the circle.Place a block to represent the cheese under the chair. Select one child, the "mouse" to sit on the chair and close his or her eyes. Then point to another child. This child must try to remove the cheese without making a sound. After the child returns to his chair in the circle,
instruct all of the children to place their hands behind their backs. Then in unison the children say,"Mouse, "Mouse, Where's the Cheese?" The "mouse" then opens his/her eyes and tries to guess who is holding the cheese. Circle Time (Discussions)
Make a story wheel: Have children draw a large circle and include major
events from the story.

Cognitive (Math Concepts/Critical Thinking)
Make flannel board pieces or magnets of different kinds, colors, and sizes of cookies. Several sets, for matching and lotto games.

Make paper cookies of a variety of shapes  Be sure there are two of each children need to match. Make paper chocolate chip cookies each cookie has a number of chips on them (1-10) Make ten mice each having a number on them (1-10) children match mouse to cookie number

Creative Arts & Activities
Make a class book- for each page, have each child dictate their response to "If you gave me a Cookie, I would ____________. Let them illustrate their pages.

Make paper cookies. Encourage children to draw circles on butcher paper, and then cut out. Let them glue chocolate chips or raisins to their cookies.

Fine/Gross Motor Development
Put out a container holding chocolate chips and a pan of tweezers. Children use the tweezers to move the chips from container to another container. (Be prepared for children to eat some of the chips) Could use raisins instead of chips = oatmeal cookies!
Have children use domino blocks to create their own domino effects; a chain reaction.

Science & Discovery (Sensory)
Give the children white play dough, rolling pins, and cookies cutters.
Encourage them to make play dough cookies. If you use baker's clay, bake them, and then let the children paint their clay cookies.

Outdoors
Provide a large box for the children to turn into a mouse-house. Give them materials as they ask for them (if possible) to furnish the house with. This
may be used to conclude or lead into a discussion about what is in our house and that everyone has the same and different things in their houses.

MOUSE IDEAS
Submitted by Kim
Mouse Cookies
With the children, prepare a batch of drop cookie dough. Demonstrate how to drop three spoonfuls of dough onto a cookie sheet so that it will resemble a mouses head with two ears when baked. The mouse cookies can be frosted or
details can be added with raisins, chocolate chips, an dstring licorice.

Mouse Day
To celebrate Mickey's birthday read the book, If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numberoff. Sing Happy Birthday and celebrate w/ mouse cookie snacks.

Play Mouse, Mouse, Where's the Cheese
This game is played in cicle formation. Arrange the chairs and place one in the center of the circle.Place a block to represent the cheese under the chair. Select one child, the "mouse" to sit on the chair and close his or her eyes. Then point to another child. This child must try to remove the cheese without making a sound. After the child returns to his chair in the circle,
instruct all of the children to place their hands behind their backs. Then in unison the children say,"Mouse, "Mouse, Where's the Cheese?" The "mouse" then opens his/her eyes and tries to guess who is holding the cheese.

Mice
Purchase or borrow mice from a pet store to keep as classrooms pets. Allow the children to assist in caring to the animals

Mouse
Here is a mouse with ears so funny,
(place index an dmiddle finger on thumb to represent a mouse)
And here is a hole in the ground.
(make a hole with the other fist)
a noise he hears, he pricks up his ears
And runs to his hole in the ground.
(jump mouse into hole in other fist)

PEAR MOUSE
Canned pear halves
Raisins
Sliced Almonds
Maraschino Cherries
Red string licorice
The children put these mice together using the ingredients above, then gobble them up!

MICE ACTIVITIES
Make a silly story. On separate large construction paper circles write each child's completion to this sentence: "If you give a mouse a ________________, he will _______________________." Allow child to illustrate the page. Bind the pages between tan construction paper cut slightly larger than the pages. Add whiskers, facial features and paper ears.

Make mouse puppets. Glue a paper nose and paper eyes to the flap of a brown lunch bag. Use a black crayon to add whiskers. Glue two brown paper (cut from a brown bag) circles to opposite side of the back for ears. Tape a brown yarn tail to the back of the bag. The children may use these for free play or when you reread the story have the puppet politely ask for what is next in the story. When you read "....he's going to ask for a glass of milk," students (mouse) should respond..."May I please have a glass of milk."

CLAY MICE
Submitted by Carol
We used an air drying clay (play dough)  that we died 3 different colors with food coloring and showed the children how to make a little mouse shape.  Larger in the rear and smaller and more narrow for the face part.
We cut our ear shapes from coffee can container lids (red, yellow, black).
We used small colored beads for the eyes and black beads for the noses.  The whiskers were made from the bristles of a brown broom and the tails were  made from pipe cleaners.  To further emphasize the letter "M" we died  all of the m's that we found in boxes of  Kraft Macaroni & Cheese Alphabets.  The children pushed the m's into the sides of their mice.  We took a picture of all of our class mice because they were so cute.

MICE
Submitted by Marla
During our unit on mice, we made them from those great big pasta shells.  The shell is the body and head all in one.  (Use your imagination here!) We tacky glued on two  elbows for the ears, let dry and then painted the entire thing
gray.   The next day we added wiggly eyes, tiny pom pom noses and yarn tails. We even made little nests from recycled milk cartons to take them home.  The children loved these and they turned out to be adorable.  It was an inspiration
in the spaghetti aisle of the grocery store one day and it worked out great!  :)

MOUSE THEME
Submitted by Betty
I had a rough time finding ideas on mice sooooo with the help of  "Mailbox" magazine, I came up with a few ideas and am now looking forward to my unit.  There are soooo many books about mice, with the biggy being "If you give a mouse a cookie...".  In dramatic play, we are going to add baking equipment to the dramatic play area. I put a small tray out and am just going to let them stir and line up bottle caps as cookies.  Thought I'd have out some construction paper , scissors, etc. and see if they can create some of their own "cookies" and "cheese".
   In art, I thought we could marble roll and then have the child find one dry spot to thumbprint a mouse (adding ears, whiskers, legs, etc. with an ink pen).  Don't you think they would just love going home and asking mom or dad to find the mouse?   In the fine motor center, I am going to try to have them try a variety of ways to poke or make holes in pieces of "cheese", (yellow, white, and orange construction paper pre-cut in various shapes).
   In the Math Center, I thought of creating a counting game with the cookie-like cereal pieces.

MOUSE A COOKIE
Submitted by Robin
I love the book If You Give A Mouse A Cookie!  I gathered up all the things that were in the story.....A plastic cookies....a tiny broom,....crayons.....pen....small cloth for a blanket and pillow......a small box to make the bed and so on.  I made a pair of mouse ears and attached them to a head band.  When I read the story someone gets to play mouse and wear the ears. and the other children select something from the box to give to the mouse. As I read the story the mouse goes and collects the items and when the story is done everything is back in the box and ready to put away.  The children like to take the box in small groups and one "reads" the story while the others take turns doing the rest.

THE LITTLE MOUSE, THE RED RIPE STRAWBERRY, ND THE BIG HUNGRY BEAR
I usually have the kids tear or cut out a red strawberry from construction and glue it onto a white paper on which I have printed at the top

"The Little Mouse ____________ _________ ." They write how they would protect it from the Big Hungry Bear and collage or draw what they would do to the strawberry.? For instance, I have had kids try to disguise it, chain it, and other creative ideas that were not in the story.? Then they draw the mouse or you can copy the blackline of the mouse right on for them.?

They turn out great and the kids are excited to come up with their own ideas.? I have put them together in a book for the class to read and they love it.

MOUSE PAINT

Circle Time (Discussions)
Read "Mouse Paint" during circle time.  Make three mice out of white construction paper. In the middle of the mouse, cut a large circle.  On the back, paste some red/blue/yellow cellophane over the circle.  The children should be able to see the transparent colours through the circle.  Overlap the different mice and ask the children what colours they see.  Leave the mice out on the discovery table for the children to play with on their own.
[adapted from an idea seen in the Giant Encyclopedia of Circle Time Activities, p. 91]

Cooking (Snacks)
I did a neat food experience with Mouse Paint once... we gave each child cream cheese  and ritz crackers, and then let them decide what colors to make their cheese...(we ended up with a lot of gray cheese, but it was fun and delicious!)

Creative Arts & Activities
Purchase several cat-toy mouses, those made from rabbit fur are especially realistic.  Have the children dip them in paint to paint their paper.
Make a mouse shape, or have the children cut their own "mice" out of fingerpaint paper.  Using finger paint or ice paints in red, blue, and yellow, let the children see what colours they can make.
Make little mice shapes out of blue, red, and yellow cellophane.  Let the children glue these "mice" onto a white sheet of construction paper.  Watch them as they explore making new colours by overlapping the mice!

Fine motor:
Have the children use scissors to cut colored sheets of acetate into smaller pieces, and use them to make a collage on clear contact paper. The colors will blend and create areas of see-through and opaque. Punch a hole in each child's color creation, and attach string for hanging.

Sensory:
Do no-mess fingerpainting. Put out fingerpaint paper  or wax paper, and tape to the table. Drop on a few blobs of thick tempera paint or fingerpaint. Cover the paint with a sheet of saran wrap, and tape down the  edges. Encourage the children to move the colors around with their hands to mix. When they're done, take off the saran wrap, and invite the children to press sheets of white paper over the wet paint to make prints.

Fine/Gross Motor Development
  a.. Movement/Listening:  A variation on "Freeze Dance". Tape different colors of construction paper to the floor. (the kids love to  help do this!)Start out with primary colors. Make sure there is the same number of particular colors as there are children (6 kids, so 6 red, etc.)Play music, and invite the children to dance. When the music stops, call out a color, and the children must find one of   the color papers to stand on. Do again and again. As they gain familiarity with color blending, you can make it harder by calling out "yellow and red", so they need to find orange.

Social/Emotional
  a.. Have sheets of acetate in each of the three primary colors. Give one to each child, and let them look through the sheets to see the world tined different colors. Encourage them to trade colors. Then, invite them to put their color sheets together with other children to look at the new colors they create. Make sure everyone changes partners to see all the different colors.

Science & Discovery (Sensory)
  a.. Sensory:  Make color blending bags. In a saucepan, pour 1 cup cornstarch, 1/3 cup sugar, and four cups water. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently. The mixture will  start to turn lumpy, and then thicken into a  sort of vaseline-looking product. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Divide into 4-6 small strong ziploc  storage bags. Squirt in a few drops of food coloring in primary colors, aiming for different areas of the bags. Press out as much air as possible, and seal the bags. Fold a piece of duct tape over the top for added security. Now- give to the kids, and let them squeeze and press the colors around. The colors will blend beautifully, and the bags will last for quite a while.

 

Webdesign and graphics by Riverdancer Designs

© 2008 - 2010 Hummingbird Educational Resources. All rights reserved